First Source


The surname CHIDESTER was a locational name 'of Chichester' a city and market town in County Sussex. Local surnames, by far the largest group, derived from a place name where the man held land or from the place from which he had come, or where he actually lived. These local surnames were originally preceded by a preposition such as "de", "atte", "by" or "in". The names may derive from a manor held, from working in a religious dwelling or from literally living by a wood or marsh or by a stream. The earliest of the name on record appears to be CISSECEASTER (without surname) who was recorded in Sussex in the year 895, and CICESTRE (without surname) was listed as a tenant in the Domesday Book of 1086. Edwin CHECHESTER of Yorkshire, was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax of 1379. During the Middle Ages, when people were unable to read or write, signs were needed for all visual identification. For several centuries city streets in Britain were filled with signs of all kinds, public houses, tradesmen and even private householders found them necessary. This was an age when there were no numbered houses, and an address was a descriptive phrase that made use of a convenient landmark. At this time, coats of arms came into being, for the practical reason that men went into battle heavily armed and were difficult to recognise. It became the custom for them to adorn their helmets with distinctive crests, and to paint their shields with animals and the like. Coats of arms accompanied the development of surnames, becoming hereditary in the same way. Later records of the name mention John Chechester, of County Devon, who registered at the University of Oxford in the year 1582. Sir John Chichester and Elizabeth Bickerstaffe, were married in Canterbury, Kent in the year 1679. A notable member of the name was Otis Holden CHIDESTER, born 22nd March 1903, in Mineral City, Ohio. He was an Educator, and his appointments included from 1937 until 1940, teaching at the Arizona School for the Deaf and Blind. In 1940, he was the Director of Graphic Arts, Tucson High School, and from 1960, the Editor of the Arizona State Vocational Association Review.

Source of information: http://www.4crests.com/chidester-coat-of-arms.html


Second Source


Origin Displayed: English

Where did the English Chidester family come from? What is the English coat of arms/family crest? When did the Chidester family first arrive in the United States? Where did the various branches of the family go? What is the history of the family name?

Multitudes of spelling variations are a hallmark of Anglo Norman names. Most of these names evolved in the 11th and 12th century, in the time after the Normans introduced their own Norman French Language into a country where Old and Middle English had no spelling rules and the languages of the court were French and Latin. To make matters worse, medieval scribes spelled words according to sound, so names frequently appeared differently in the various documents in which they were recorded. The name was spelled Chichester, Chister, Chichestere, Chichister and others.
First found in Devonshire where they were anciently seated as Lords of the Manor of Raleigh in that shire. Conjecturally, the family name is descended from the holder of the lands of Raleigh at the time of the taking of the Domesday Book survey, a census initiated by Duke William of Normandy in 1086 after his conquest of England at Hastings in 1066 A.D.
Because of this political and religious unrest within English society, many people decided to immigrate to the colonies. Families left for Ireland, North America, and Australia in enormous numbers, travelling at high cost in extremely inhospitable conditions. The New World in particular was a desirable destination, but the long voyage caused many to arrive sick and starving. Those who made it, though, were welcomed by opportunities far greater than they had known at home in England. Many of these families went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations of Canada and the United States. Analysis of immigration records indicates that some of the first North American immigrants bore the name Chidester or a variant listed above: James Chichester who settled in Massachusetts in 1635; Edward Chichester settled in Nevis in 1670; William Chichester settled in Virginia in 1652; J.W.

Motto Translated: Firm in Faith
Chidester_01.jpg

Source of information: http://www.houseofnames.com/xq/asp.fc/qx/chidester-family-crest.htm


Possible Sources


http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~aberseek/index.html#Chidester
http://genforum.genealogy.com/chidester/
http://www.genealogytoday.com/surname/finder.mv?Surname=Chidester




First Source - Higginbotham

Origin Displayed: English

Where did the English Higginbotham family come from? What is the English coat of arms/family crest? When did the Higginbotham family first arrive in the United States? Where did the various branches of the family go? What is the history of the family name?

The English language only became standardized in the last few centuries; therefore,spelling variations are common among early Anglo-Saxon names. As the form of the English language changed, even the spelling of literate people's names evolved. Higginbotham has been recorded under many different variations, including Higginbottom, Higginbotham, Hickenbottom, Hickinbottom, Higgenbottom, Higginbothem, Higinbotham, Higinbothem and many more.
First found in Cheshire where they were seated from very ancient times, some say well before the Norman Conquest and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 A.D.
For many English families, the political and religious disarray that shrouded England made the far away New World an attractive prospect. On cramped disease-ridden ships, thousands migrated to those British colonies that would eventually become Canada and the United States. Those hardy settlers that survived the journey often went on to make important contributions to the emerging nations in which they landed. Analysis of immigration records indicates that some of the first North American immigrants bore the name Higginbotham or a variant listed above: John Higginbotham settled with his wife and servants in the Barbados in 1680; Richard Higginbottom settled in Virginia in 1726; Thomas Higginbottom settled in New England in 1774.


  • Ancestors and Descendants of James Larkin Higginbotham of Noxubee County, Mississippi by Rachel Hollingsworth Higginbotham.
  • An American Family and Its Ancestor Predecessor; Back to Adam through Early American Immigrants of British Extraction According to Past and Present Records by Vivian Higgins Morse.
Higginbotham_01.jpg

Source of information: http://www.houseofnames.com/xq/asp.fc/qx/chidester-family-crest.htm


Second Source - Higginbotham

This surname was a locational name 'of Higginbottom' a small spot now obsolete in the neighbourhood of Marple and Macclesfield in East Cheshire. The history of the placename is somewhat confused but it is probably composed of the elements AECEN (oaken) and BOTME (broad valley) literally meaning 'the dweller in the hollow or lowland where Higgin lived'. Early records of the name mention Alexander de Akinbothum, 1246, Lancashire and John Hyginbotham appears in County Yorkshire in the year 1300. Mary Higginbotham of Yorkshire was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax of 1379. Nicholas Hichinbothome (gent) of Marple Cheshire was listed in the Wills at Chester in 1579. Joseph Higenbotom and Sarah Bacon were married at St. George's, Hanover Square, London in the year 1762. Since the dawn of civilisation the need to communicate has been a prime drive of all higher mankind. The more organised the social structure became, the more urgent the need to name places, objects and situations essential to the survival and existence of the social unit. From this common stem arose the requirements to identify families, tribes and individual members evolving into a pattern in evidence today. In the formation of this history, common usage of customs, trades, locations, patronymic and generic terms were often adopted as surnames. The demands of bureaucracy formally introduced by feudal lords in the 11th century, to define the boundaries and families within their fiefdoms, crystallized the need for personal identification and accountability, and surnames became in general use from this time onwards. Between the 11th and 15th centuries it became customary for surnames to be assumed in Europe, although they were not commonplace in England or Scotland before the Norman Conquest of 1066. Those of gentler blood, particularly those who had been on the Crusades, assumed surnames at this time, but it was not until the reign of Edward II (1327-1327) that it became common practice for all people. The associated coat of arms is recorded in Sir Bernard Burkes General Armory. Ulster King of Arms in 1884.

Source of information: http://www.4crests.com/higginbotham-coat-of-arms.html